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  There’s no arguing that modern technology poses a range of dangers to your children’s development and to the value of their relationships. You know your child needs your guidance to develop a healthy relationship with technology, and to learn to regulate their own use in a healthy manner in the long term. You also know that you must protect your child, especially from more acute threats, until they learn the foundations of self-regulation. Ideally, your child’s school would partner with you to help you manage technology use and nurture the development of your child’s inner life. But the reality is that screen time and internet exposure is becoming increasingly pervasive in most schools. The world is becoming increasingly digital. Whether you keep your children on a strict screen-time schedule or allow them to regulate their own time, these tools will help you keep your children safe as they explore the digital world.   Password Manager Password managers can keep your children from accessing sensitive account information while using your devices, while keeping those accounts accessible to you. A password manager is digital organizer for all of your online passwords that is stored online and accessed with, well, a password. The benefit of a password manager is freedom of security. With a password manager you can protect all of your online accounts with strong passwords with the reassurance that you will be able to access your accounts even if you can’t remember each individual password. And that’s great, because the number of password protected accounts we need just to get from one place to another is only increasing. When deciding on a password manager, you’ll have to determine whether you prefer cloud storage or local storage, which will depend on two things: how much functionality you desire and how paranoid you are. Local storage is a good idea if you’re very worried about a data breach or if you work in a highly sensitive field.   Parental Controls Nearly every digital device is equipped with parental controls designed to help parents set and enforce limits on screen time, content, and more. Sometimes, a device’s onboard parental controls simply aren’t enough. In those cases, there is a wide range of third-party controls, which give parents more options and provide greater functionality.  Most parental control apps require a yearly paid subscription, so be sure the app you choose is right for your family’s needs. Parental controls are important on your child’s personal devices, as well as family devices.   Click here for a detailed list of parental control options.   Communicate Any time you consider restriction, you must also consider how such measures will affect trust between you and your child. Your child needs your trust to transition through to adulthood in a whole, healthy manner. However, this trust must be mutual. Your child must also trust you. Thus the importance of communication. As a parent, you can’t demand trust. It’s a gradual process that requires mutual commitment and constant communication over time.    “Our highest endeavor must be to develop free human beings who are able of themselves to impart purpose and direction to their lives. The need for imagination, a sense of truth, and a feeling of responsibility—these three forces are the very nerve of education.” ― Rudolf Steiner   We minimize screen time and maximize our students' experience. Want to see how we do it? Schedule a tour! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
College recruiters are actively seeking Waldorf educated youth for their programs in record numbers. Since the release of this 2015 study published by Stanford University, primary and secondary educators have become increasingly aware of the exceptional quality and deeper learning opportunities of Waldorf education, and increasingly enthusiastic. This year alone, 94% of graduating seniors at the Denver Waldorf High School have been accepted to high quality postsecondary institutions, earning $4.4M in scholarships. Waldorf students leave high school with three traits the best colleges and universities are particularly excited about.   Are you looking for a great high school? Take this free checklist with you on your high school tours!  (Click here to download now.)   Self-direction. In a world where change is the only thing we can count on, it’s not enough to wait for instructions. To be successful, one must be able to assess circumstances and direct their own actions. This is so not only for employment, but for life. A self-directed individual can look beyond the norm to piece together a fulfilling life for themselves based on their own needs and joys. These are the individuals who are least susceptible to mental illness and spiritual fatigue. Personal Development. Before adulthood, personal development is a physiological function of growth. Later, however, we must actively and consciously endeavor to continue growing toward our best selves. Waldorf education prepares graduates to strive continuously toward personal growth and development. They’re challenged not only to examine the world around them, but the world within them. And they career this ability into the rest of their life. Academic Confidence. It’s long been understood that confidence, one’s belief in themselves, is the spice of success. However, overreaching confidence can become detrimental when not focused. Academic confidence is specific. Waldorf high school students are challenged to learn that they can learn. They leave high school confident in their ability to identify problems and investigate solutions. We know from experience why Waldorf students are in such high demand at the world’s best colleges and universities. But what does the research say? “One overriding result is that Waldorf students seem more interested to learn and more socially engaged than mainstream students,” according to Bob Dahlin, international academic and author of Rudolf Steiner: The Relevance of Waldorf Education.   Read "How to Choose the Right High School"   But this study isn’t all roses. In his conclusion, Dahlin suggests that while Waldorf students leave high school with a greater likelihood of being driven to continue their education not only immediately in college or university, but throughout their life, they may be behind their peers in fact recitation. He notes in his examination that we may have to choose between fostering wrote memorization of a greater pool of facts, or fewer recitable facts and a greater passion for inquiry. Higher education administrators appear to have made their choice. In a world wherein all factual knowledge is accessible instantaneously, fostering the intrinsic drive to discover is the most important trait we can foster in our youth to ensure lifelong success. Come see how we do it. Schedule a tour of our high school! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
From meditation to dreams, the vital health benefits of quieting our thoughts and exploring our mind have been well documented. Research supports the growing trend of including meditation in education. Schools worldwide have even gone as far as replacing detention and other traditionally punitive measures with breathing and meditation. Though the conversation about how these practices are beneficial, there is little discussion around why these practices are so beneficial. And really, though the prompt is common, there’s very little discussion about what actually happens when we “turn off the mind.” Turning off the mind. Nearly every beginner’s meditation lesson opens with “quieting the mind.” But what does that mean? What is truly meant by quiet in the mind is silencing the thoughts. In our daily lives we spend a lot of our time thinking. Thinking is our overt internal examination of our place in the world. Though our thoughts are formed and explored within ourselves, they are informed and tempered in their expression by conditions from without. Thoughts are loud, and they often overwhelm the mind. In order to experience our mind, we must slow and quiet our thoughts to reach the deeper, more organic mind; to experience our inner world. The inner life. Your thoughts are not your inner life. What happens when you try to clear your mind? First, thoughts race. You remember an appointment or another commitment. A flash of your to-do list may come up. When you giggle a bit at a joke that flashes in your awareness, you’re getting closer. You may sense the scent of an old memory, and get carried away on a wave of forgotten emotion. At this point, you’re beyond your thoughts. Images, sensations, ideas all come together. Sometimes they make patterns, sometimes they don’t. In your early exploration you may struggle to resist the urge to allow your thoughts to come in and dictate explanations or patterns. And if you do resist this urge, something truly magical will happen. You will come to experience your inner world. While your thoughts can be shared, your inner life – your self – is personal and unique. Your thoughts can translate between your inner world and that of another, but that does not make your thoughts truly representative of the world that is formed within. Fostering wellness in the minds of teens. Fostering a rich inner life is vital to your teen’s long-term mental wellness. The task of fostering wellness in the minds of our teens has never been more apparent. We’ve reached epidemic levels of mental illness, depression, and even self-harm among today’s youth as a society. The richness of one’s inner life depends on exploration. We must give our teens the same time to explore their imagination as we did when they were small children.   Our students leave with a strong sense of self and a healthy inner life. Come see how we do it. Tour our school! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
What does it mean to be vulnerable? In a world where it’s become popular to deride anyone who doesn’t have “thick skin”, anyone who believes in standing up for something – including themselves – it may be difficult as a parent to embrace teaching your child to be vulnerable. We want them to be safe, after all. We want them to be protected. But what is lost in the space between our hearts, and our armor? And what happens when that armor comes off? In her latest book, Dare to Lead, author and renown researcher Brené Brown tackles some important questions about the demands and expectations on today’s workforce, and how our negative cultural view of vulnerability makes those expectations unattainable. She states, “If we want people to fully show up, to bring their whole selves including their unarmored, whole hearts—so that we can innovate, solve problems, and serve people—we have to be vigilant about creating a culture in which people feel safe, seen, heard, and respected.” There’s no denying that innovation is the highest value currency of today. It’s what drives start-ups to the top of the heap in record times. It’s what keeps established companies from disappearing into the fog of antiquity. The world economy is powered foremost by innovation. And an increasing number of companies and organizations are taking note of the discoveries of intellectuals like Brené, working hard to transform their cultures to be more supportive of their employees as complex emotional beings. Which means the world is working hard to become a safer place. So what? Mental illness, bullying, violence, and self-harm are all on the rise among teens. Watching the news, getting a glimpse of the world our high schoolers live in is terrifying. Why should you teach your child to bring down their barriers and open their heart to such a cruel world? And what does that have to do with being innovative? Success happens where innovation, courage, and resilience come together. It’s no coincidence that each of these is related to vulnerability. Courage is a precursor to vulnerability. Without courage, our children will keep their hearts hidden behind their armor. They’ll keep their ideas, their hopes and dreams, their joys back there too. With their armor up they risk never making the impact they came into this world to make. And they risk never making the connections with others that make life worth living. They may never hurt, that’s true. But they may never feel anything at all. Our children’s courage begins where ours, as parents, ends. We must be brave enough to send our young ones into the world with open hearts. As their courage is tested, something extraordinary and vital happens: our children become stronger. They become resilient. It’s easy as parents to make ourselves believe that the best way to keep our children from harm is to protect them; teach them to armor up and avoid pain at all cost. In reality, though, the best thing we can do is to prepare them from hardship and teach them how to cope. The road to success is paved with sweat and failure. True community comes from finding your place after rejection. Contentment is the awareness of that which does not bring us joy, and the presence of those things that do. We cannot know these higher pleasures without experiencing their less enjoyable emotional counterparts. Right? Of course right. So how do we teach our children to find strength in their vulnerability. How do we ourselves embrace our own vulnerability to model the benefits of an open heart to our teens. First, stop protecting yourself. Take some time to evaluate your relationships and how well you build trust with others in your life. Are you wearing armor into the world? Take it off. Even if you’ve been hurt, try to rebuild. Next, stop protecting your teen. They will get hurt, and that’s ok. But when they do, be there for them. Not to solve their problems or to ease their pain, but to support them as they work through that pain. Be there with them and don’t look away. You’ll build trust, and they’ll build resilience that will carry them through the rest of their life.   Our students are well prepared for the world. Come see how we're different. Schedule a tour of our school! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
Innovations in technology means changes in the paths our children may take in the world. Work requiring a human touch is becoming more select. Yesterday’s jobs – and the security that came with them – are rapidly being replaced by either algorithms or creative thinkers who cannot only predict innovation, but drive it. Innovation is the currency of modern success, and innovation is driven from within. But this isn’t another story about innovation, per se. This article, is about success, and the attributes we can instill in our children and teens to ensure they achieve it. This article is about the lifelong success equation. The components of success have changed dramatically since we entered the world. It used to be that as soon as you found a good job, you gained the keys to the rest of your life. Keep your nose to the grindstone and remember where your bread is buttered and you’d never want for at least the basics. There was a simple equation: Hard work + patience = success That is not the world we live in today. Today, the only job options that allow you to keep under the radar will not come close to providing for an equitable lifestyle. Professional career options across the spectrum expect new employees to get in the fray with new ideas and lateral communication before they get a chance to decorate their new open-office desk space. The new function of success looks quite a bit different:   (Curiosity + Courage) - (Opportunity / Hard work) * WHY = Success(100)   A little more complicated, right? So, what does it mean? Think of each attribute in this equation as having two values. The first value is clear, it is the conceptual value of the word. The second value is numerical, which operates to help predict the likelihood of success based on the presence of a value on a scale from 0-1. Are you still with me? Here’s what that looks like. Curiosity. Curiosity is the driver of innovation. And that’s important, because more than money, innovation is the currency of today. Curiosity is the insatiable drive to find answers. Curiosity drives Waldorf graduates to observe, investigate, and understand on a deep level, driving innovation and long-term progress. In industry, curiosity is the catalyst of systemic growth. It’s what makes start-ups rise to the top of the heap in years or even months, and it’s what keeps established organizations from drowning in the torrential sea of change. This value may be any number between 0 where there is no curiosity and 1 where curiosity is high. Courage. Without the courage to ask the hard questions, find the answers, present those answers, break out of the mold and challenge the status quo, ability cannot manifest into results. In the modern corporate world, everyone must be a leader. And leadership takes courage – namely, the courage to build trust within a team and express ideas. Without courage, the product of one’s curiosity will never be brought to light. This value may be any number between 1 where courage is present, 0 if it is not. Opportunity. This is where honesty comes into play. Once an individual has followed their curiosity to a new idea, and voiced that idea to their peers, they must assess opportunity. Opportunity describes the barriers to bringing a new idea into the world. In a company or organization, those barriers could involve revenue or research & development costs. Barriers could involve market share or commonality with what the company already produces. Personally, those barriers could be fear, experience, and the strength to move forward. The numerical value for opportunity can be any number from 0 to 1. Ultimately, the true value of opportunity will be determined by hard work. Hard Work. Hard work and opportunity go hand in hand. One may have a great idea and high opportunity score, but if without hard work the idea will never take root in the world. Give this value any number between 1 for very hard work and 0 for no work at all. WHY. Here is the defining piece. Is it worth it? Your “WHY” or purpose is the measure of the meaning behind what you do. If the expected results of an opportunity served by hard work does not serve an individual’s purpose, the meaning behind the activity is lost, and the value with it. Give WHY a value of either 1 if there’s a fit, or 0 if there is not. Ok, let’s practice: If (Curiosity + Courage) - (Opportunity * Hard work) * WHY = Success(100) is represented as (.8 +.6) – (.4/.8)*1=0.9(100)=90%   Want to see this equation in action? Schedule a visit to our high school! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
We’ve developed a culture motivated by external rewards, unrelated compensation for work done. On a basic level, this drive is a natural extension of the give-take relationship between working members of a community. In a functioning society, all members participate in bringing goods to bear for trade, so that the entire community may live a more fruitful life. But education is personal. Inquiry is the mechanism by which we each advance our own understanding of the observable world and our place within it. Intrinsic motivation to learn is at the heart of our curriculum. Come see how we teach it. Click here to schedule a tour!   It is rare to see a child in a traditional learning environment who is motivated to learn by their own curiosity. Rather than inspired to seek answers to the questions that move them, they are coerced by reward or even punishment to behave in a way that suggests learning. However, the act of reciting memorized materials is far from the ability to integrate information into a working body of knowledge. This model is counterintuitive to developing individuals who are fulfilled, emotionally healthy, and have a place in the modern workforce. The dismemberment of information from curiosity stifles intellectual development. In other words, the model of punishment or reward for work done is counterintuitive to preparing teens for life-long success. Dr. Barbra L. McCombs states in her work Motivation and Lifelong Learning Summary that, “The motivation to learn is an internal, naturally occurring capacity of human beings that is enhanced and nurtured by quality of relationships, opportunities of personal choice and responsibility for learning meaningful learning tasks. Lifelong learning is also a natural propensity of humans to continue to grow, learn, and develop that is facilitated by uncovering the enjoyment of learning and reducing negative thoughts and belief systems.” By teaching teens to think about everything, to use curiosity as a lens through which to see the world not only as it is, but as it can be, we can prepare them to take the lead in a constantly changing world. Come see us in action. Schedule a tour of our school! hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
Being a teenager is challenging. On one hand they’re expected to be adults, to discover who they are in the myriad possibilities and support themselves physically and emotionally. Far too many teens are challenged to practically pick out a personality from a two-dimensional storefront of limited acceptance, and then cash that in for a place in the workforce. On the other hand, they are still children, unprepared to face the demands of a fluid, ever-changing world. Their brains and bodies are nearly, but not quite developed. And their range of emotions are difficult to name, much less manage. The stresses of this tumultuous age are many. It’s no wonder teens are so often found immersing themselves in media – video games, movies and television, social media. It’s almost like they’re trying to drown out the world. Where does education fit in? And how can educators help empower teens to lead more fulfilling lives? By acknowledging that every individual is a mirror of human progress throughout the ages, and endeavoring to educate each child wholly.   Our unique approach to education promotes healthy teen development intellectually, physically, and emotionally. Come see how we do it. Sign up to tour our school!   Rudolf Steiner, the founder of Anthroposophy, described the development of each individual as a reflection of the three parts of human development since the Middle Ages. To paraphrase, he illustrated personal growth as being indicative of the segments of social awareness, and prescribed these three parts be brought together in the development of a well-adjusted child. The Waldorf education model, which is based on observations of Anthroposophy, endeavors to support the organic develop of the entire child – mind, body, and spirit. We do this, by educating each segment according to its assets, and allowing the child’s natural propensity for curiosity and exploration to bring it all together in the unique imprint that is the child’s individuality. We endeavor to educate the child’s mind, body, and spirit, and then nurture the youth’s exploration of these concepts and the development of their true self. Here’s how. Educate the mind. The mind craves facts. It seeks knowledge, and feels secure in recognition of figures and patterns. The mind is where we wield tools such as language, observation and arithmetic. Developing this attribute through exposure and challenging new concepts is how we help teens develop a strong foundation from which they may challenge all new information. The mainstream education system is focused on superficially developing the mind, much to the detriment of the rest of the child. Waldorf educators encourage students to develop a relationship with knowledge that is greater than just memorization. We teach our students the importance of purpose, inquiry, and how to use knowledge to achieve a greater purpose. In order to use knowledge to achieve a greater purpose, one must have a greater purpose to achieve. We’ll get to that. Educate the body. Mainstream education treats the development of the body, often through sport, as an exercise in character development. Sometimes, physical activity is viewed as little more than a necessary chore for physiological maintenance. Rarely does education recognize the foundational merits of movement, or the deeper importance of a healthy, active connection between body and mind. Waldorf educators realize that there is a physical representation of all knowledge, one that can be experienced by the body and bodily senses. Furthermore, to experience that representation and become both mentally and physically aware of a concept enlivens an individual’s relationship with that concept, and enhances the observer's holistic development. These experiences come together to inform a richer inner life.   Come see how we do it. Click here to schedule a tour of our school! Educate the spirit. The spirit is the most neglected aspect of the human being. It is often overlooked in social settings, and overtly avoided in education. Where most tie the education of the spirit to a religious pretense, Waldorf educators recognize the spirit as independent of religious practice. The spirit is the seat of empathy. It is the body by which we experience the unseen both within and between each other. The inner life. All human beings possess an inner life. For many, the inner life is far from fulfilling. In an unhealthy individual, that life may even be damaging, rife with negativity and possessive of little else. These are the teens and adults you’ll find constantly immersed in external escapism, trying to drown out the world inside. Those deprived of a rich inner life become dependent on external entertainment, and often find a growing need they cannot externally meet. Conversely, a rich, healthy inner life provides an individual with a safe place to experiment with the meaning of their experiences and their place in the world. Where all the learnings come together in a unique and special way, there the teen’s true self comes alive. Come see our high school in action! Schedule a tour. hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
Problem solving gets a lot of attention, and for good reason. As an employee, those who can identify a problem and quickly find a solution can spare their team a lot of stress. And in today’s relatively egalitarian workspace, everyone is responsible for contributing ideas and solutions. It’s no wonder, therefore, that the best universities and employers keep problem solving high on the list of admirable attributes. Less discussed is problem-solving’s more creative cousin, problem finding. What do I mean by more creative? Recent research into creativity shows that problem finding - the ability to discover, create, or preempt problems in order to better understand a mechanism – serves a prime role in “intrinsically motivated creative performance.” Of course that’s great if your child plans to enter a creative career. It’s also important in nearly any career. The days of getting good at your job and staying there for thirty years are long gone. Your child is entering a world that changes at the speed of ideas. It will always be important to be able to solve problems. However, in this new, fluid economy, problem solving is just too slow.   Don’t forget a thing on your high school tours. Click here to download the High School Checklist.   What is problem solving? In ages past, when change took decades or even lifetimes, problem solving was one of the most valuable skills an individual could carry with them into a career. Reserved primarily for leaders, problem solving skills were an elite quality generally only acknowledged in upper management even in more creative organizations. Over time, however, the hierarchical model of paid ideation disintegrated beneath the weight of consumer demand. It became everyone’s job to drop a comment in the box, if you will, though the cultural shift toward breaking down that hierarchy didn’t take so easily. Many of those comments were ignored. Up to that point, problem solvers were those who could take the numbers weeks, months, even years after the problem began, and quickly piece together a “solution.” With a band-aid on the issue, it would be weeks, months, even years before anyone discovered that the solution didn’t work or worse, it caused a new problem. It turns out, problem solving doesn’t affect long-term success. Problem solving cuts the discovery process short, focuses on the symptom, and most inefficient, is reactionary. What is problem finding? Today, change happens rapidly. The modern world – employment economy included – can comfortably be described as fluid. By the time a solution rolls out in a large organization, a new problem has arisen. The time an organization spends trying to stop leaks is time a competing organization spends attracting the first company’s business. Individuals working under this type of stress cannot thrive. They get swept up in the current and moved along too fast until everything falls to pieces – at work and at home. A defining attribute of problem finders is their ability to be comfortable with discomfort in order to take the time they need to examine and identify the root of a problem. Problem finding, then, allows individuals to delve more deeply into issues affecting their work, and that’s great. What makes problem finders more successful, however, is their ability to dig deeply and find the cause of problems affecting their life, feelings, and relationships. Because the eagerness of problem solving tempts solvers to accept the easiest answer, they tend to attribute difficult interpersonal situations to the ill will of others. Conversely, problem finders are more willing to spend time in their discomfort to discover the true reason behind their negative interactions, even if it implicates themselves. So, which is it? Helping youth develop their problem finding skills certainly prepares them for success in their future career, relationships, and personal wellness. Promoting problem solving skills prepares youth to think on their feet, overcome problems quickly, and lead effectively from anywhere in an organization. Which is it, then? Well, both. Ideally, as parents and educators we teach our children how to find problems, how to solve problems, and when to do each. Better yet, we prepare youth for independence by teaching them how to discover the answers for themselves. Come see our high school in action! Schedule a tour. hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...
And How to Make Sure Your Child Is One of Them.   Innovation. Have you heard that word lately? Unless you’ve been away from the world for a while, chances are you hear it every day. You don’t just hear it, you live it. And your children live it too. Today’s youth don’t just live in innovation, they learn it. They embody it. And for those who will choose to enter the workforce in nearly any vertical, they will be expected to drive innovation and predict the next big change in their industry. The momentum of today’s world is breathtaking, not always in a good way. As a society, we’ve yet to bridge the gap between the constant, fluid change driven by technological advancement and the perfectly human need for predictability, identifiable patterns, and stability. The stress of job insecurity and constant adaptation has resulted in the most anxious and depressed generation since, well, the Depression. There are those who thrive, however. They don’t just adapt, they drive industrial, technological, and even social advancement so easily it looks natural. That’s because it is natural. They’re innovative. Yet, though advancement is a natural byproduct of their actions, the attributes that drive their actions and decisions can be nurtured in anyone.   Don’t forget a thing on your high school tours. Click here to download the High School Checklist.   Problem finding: Innovation begins with problem finding. Not problem solving, finding a quick solution to the observable symptoms of a problem; problem finding, the ability to discover, create, or preempt problems in order to better understand the deeper mechanism. Problem finding is a function of curiosity and courage. Vulnerability: To be vulnerable is to be human. Empathy, posing ideas, challenging the status quo to be a catalyst for change - these strengths embody innovation, but are rarely attributed to their true source. They require an individual to first expose their emotional weakness. In a world where everyone is expected to be a celebrity in their own right, becoming comfortable with vulnerability is a mark of future greatness and the ultimate skill for success. Motivation: Motivation is a hot topic, one that extends across time and space. Any motivation has its merits, but individuals who rely on external motivation tend to fall behind. Frankly, society isn’t built to maintain a system of external motivation. Sustainable motivation is intrinsic. It comes from within. For those innovators who constantly, naturally drive progress, intrinsic motivation manifests as curiosity, the insatiable drive to find answers. Not solutions, but answers. While solutions “fix” a problem, answers explain a problem. And from that explanation comes a resolution that leads to the next innovation. Courage: Talk about character is constant, but breaking it down and naming the components is rare. Problems manifest from this oversight in the form of focus on developing confidence, when what our children really need is courage. Confidence is important, of course. Confidence in one’s belief in themself or their ability. We’re particularly partial to academic confidence. It’s internal, and reflects the self. Courage is a little different. It refers to one’s ability to overcome doubt derived from the perception of danger from outside one’s self. That danger can be physical, but is typically social. Without courage, thoughts and ideas are kept inside, never getting a chance to change the world. Innovative, or creative, people have a significant advantage in the twenty-first century. Which is why it’s so important to instill these traits in our youth to prepare them for the world they will soon inherit. Would you like to see how we prepare our high school students for life-long success? Come see our high school in action! Schedule a tour. hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "5527169", formId: "be73eac6-6d13-455e-ada6-12c4079324bf" }); ...